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Thursday, January 13, 2011

North Pole Shift

Recently, the shifting of Earth's magnetic North Pole has made news headlines. The North Pole has been recorded to be shifting since the early 1800's. Currently, the North Pole has been shifting at a rate of 30-40 miles per year towards Russia. Scientists say that a total reversal of the poles is likely to occur. My question is: will the effects of a total shift create catastrophic events on our planet? One would think, considering the effects this would have on tectonic plates, our climate, the ecosystem ect. However, NASA has stated, "As far as we know, such a magnetic reversal doesn't cause any harm to life on Earth." According to scientists, a total polar reversal happens every 400,000 years - if that number is correct then how are we to know that it doesn't cause any harm?

What are your thoughts on this?

5 comments:

Diana said...

Your post is thought provoking. If scientists think nothing of note will occur;what about the earthquakes, floods, and other catastophic events already occuring?

laserjet multifunction  said...

The shifting phenomenon in itself may not at all cause any adverse damage. I think that soon enough, all of can adapt with what is happening.

Anonymous said...

I suppose it depends on what kind of "harm" one is talking about. A forest fire can be called harm by a group of human beings, while in the wider scheme of things, it is simply part of a cycle. Earthquakes, floods, or heightened solar energy making its way to the planet's surface is likewise potentially 'harming'...in the extreme short term of "a century or so". In comparison to a wider view on history...be it that which the evolutionists believe in, or that which "Forbidden Archaeology" believes in...it is unlikely that it is catastrophic to Earth as a whole.

Anonymous said...

ice core samples tell alot about this sub....both the arctic more so tho the antartic.. independent university findings are scarily similar...almost jaw dropping...research them and agree to disagree but with the climactic and geographical changes that occurred then and if humans had the numbers we have today, hmmmm....food for thought....

Artemis said...

This is nothing new. The polar axis is not moving, just the magnetic pole is moving, which as your article pointed out happens all the time. When plotting a course on a map and then using a compass to navigate by, one has to account for the declination which is given on the map. This declination is always given in degrees +/-. The adage, East is least, West is best is used. This means the degrees of declination is subtracted from the compass heading when the declination is Eastward and added to the compass heading when the declination is Westward. This adding or subtracting of degrees allows one to use their compass accurately.